bash는 PS1 변수를 통해 프롬프트의 모양을 바꿀 수 있다.


내가 사용하는 bash의 PS1 설정

export PS1="\[\e[36;1m\]\u@\[\e[32;1m\]\h:\[\e[31;1m\]\w:> \[\e[0m\]"

 


위와 같이 사용자명@호스트명:폴더명이 보기 좋게 색깔로 구분된다. 

(SecureCRT 같이 제대로 된 terminal 을 사용해야 한다)

 

추가로 .bash_profile 에 다음 내용도 등록해 놓는다.

 

 

export PS1="\[\e[36;1m\]\u@\[\e[32;1m\]\h:\[\e[31;1m\]\w:> \[\e[0m\]"
export TERM=linux
export LC_MESSAGES=en_US
 
alias vi='vim $*'
alias mvn='/usr/local/apache-maven-3.0.4/bin/mvn'

사용자 등록시마다 자동으로 위 설정이 반영되게 하려면 /etc/skel/.bash_profile 을 수정한다.

# .bash_profile
# Get the aliases and functions
if [ -f ~/.bashrc ]; then
        . ~/.bashrc
fi
# User specific environment and startup programs
export PS1="\[\e[36;1m\]\u@\[\e[32;1m\]\h:\[\e[31;1m\]\w:> \[\e[0m\]"
export TERM=linux
export LC_MESSAGES=en_US
alias vi='vim $*'
PATH=$PATH:$HOME/bin
export PATH

 

 

참고 

man bash의 PROMPTING 항목

When  executing  interactively,  bash displays the primary prompt PS1 when it is ready to read a command, and the secondary prompt PS2 when it needs more input to complete a command.  Bash allows these prompt strings to be customized by inserting a number of backslash-escaped special characters that are decoded as follows:

  \a     an ASCII bell character (07)

  \d     the date in "Weekday Month Date" format (e.g., "Tue May 26")

  \D{format}

  the  format  is  passed  to  strftime(3) and the result is inserted into the prompt string; an empty format results in a

  locale-specific time representation.  The braces are required

  \e     an ASCII escape character (033)

  \h     the hostname up to the first '.'

  \H     the hostname

  \j     the number of jobs currently managed by the shell

  \l     the basename of the shell's terminal device name

  \n     newline

  \r     carriage return

  \s     the name of the shell, the basename of $0 (the portion following the final slash)

  \t     the current time in 24-hour HH:MM:SS format

  \T     the current time in 12-hour HH:MM:SS format

  \@     the current time in 12-hour am/pm format

  \A     the current time in 24-hour HH:MM format

  \u     the username of the current user

  \v     the version of bash (e.g., 2.00)

  \V     the release of bash, version + patch level (e.g., 2.00.0)

  \w     the current working directory, with $HOME abbreviated with a tilde

  \W     the basename of the current working directory, with $HOME abbreviated with a tilde

  \!     the history number of this command

  \#     the command number of this command

  \$     if the effective UID is 0, a #, otherwise a $

  \nnn   the character corresponding to the octal number nnn

  \\     a backslash

  \[     begin a sequence of non-printing characters, which could be used to embed a terminal control sequence into the prompt

  \]     end a sequence of non-printing characters  

     The command number and the history number are usually different: the history number of a command is its position in the history  list,

 

       which  may  include  commands  restored  from  the  history  file (see HISTORY below), while the command number is the position in the

       sequence of commands executed during the current shell session.  After the string is decoded, it is expanded via parameter  expansion,

       command  substitution,  arithmetic expansion, and quote removal, subject to the value of the promptvars shell option (see the descrip-

       tion of the shopt command under SHELL BUILTIN COMMANDS below).


 




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